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New York City-based wordsmith, A. Scott Boddie has a flair for writing fiction and high fantasy which makes him a sought after writer. His passion to create strong, fluid, and narrative driven books is highlighted in his works. Mr. Boddie received his BBA and MBA from Baker College before spending two decades working in the financial industry. At the age of 40, he left the corporate world to pursue his real passion -- writing. Since first reading “Where the Wild Things Are” by Maurice Sendak in grade school, he knew that he was meant to tell his fantastical stories to the world. Inspired by the likes of Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, David Sedaris, and Wally Lamb, Mr. Boddie creates characters with a unique voice and quirky personality -- characters who aren’t scared to share insecurities, fears, hopes, and dreams. Coming from a long line of oral storytellers, his natural ability to develop these characters through monologue and conversation make him one of the most intriguing writers of our time.

Saturday, June 4, 2011

Gay Pride A. Scott Boddie

LGBT pride or gay pride is the concept that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people should be proud of their sexual orientation and gender identity.[1][2] The movement has three main premises: that people should be proud of their sexual orientation and gender identity, that diversity is a gift, and that sexual orientation and gender identity are inherent and cannot be intentionally altered.[3] The use of the abbreviated gay pride and pride have since become mainstream and shorthand expressions inclusive of all individuals in various LGBT communities.

The word pride is used in this case as an antonym for shame, which has been used to control and oppress LGBT persons throughout history. Pride in this sense is an affirmation of one's self and the community as a whole. The modern "pride" movement began after the "Stonewall riots" in 1969. Instead of backing down to unconstitutional raids by New York City Police Department, gay people in local bars fought back. While it was a violent situation it also gave the underground community the first sense of communal pride in a very well publicized incident. From the yearly parade that commemorated the anniversary of the Stonewall riots began a national grassroots movement. Today many countries around the world celebrate LGBT pride. The pride movement has furthered the cause of gay rights by lobbying politicians, registering voters and increasing visibility to educate on issues important to LGBT communities. LGBT pride advocates work for equal "rights and benefits" for LGBT people.Wikipedia

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A. Scott Boddie

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